Product Review “Warm Glass…”

Posted by on Nov 15, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

warm_glass_complete_guide_to_kiln-forming_techniques_fusing_slumping_castingProduct Review – Warm Glass: A Complete Guide to Kiln-Forming Techniques: Fusing, Slumping, Casting written by: Philippa Beveridge, Ignasi Domenech, and Eva Pacual.

 

 

I love to learn about fused glass whether it is through classes (see August Blogs), eBooks, or actual books. I also like trying new products therefore, I thought I would write a few product and book reviews on the various items I have purchased. Please understand this is my personal view and is not intended to offend anyone. I just like trying new things and I would like to share my experiences with others. I am not paid to write these reviews.

Overall I liked Warm Glass: A Complete Guide to Kiln-Forming Techniques: Fusing, Slumping, Casting, albeit I think it is best utilized as a reference guide not a fun and interesting how to fuse book.

The introduction states Warm Glass” is a “practical manual” and an “effective source” of information and I agree. It is similar to a reference or textbook with detailed information on glass, molds and projects. It contains meticulous data on the whys and how of the characteristics of glass. I will give a overview of Warm Glass: A Complete Guide to Kiln-Forming Techniques: Fusing, Slumping, Casting.

Chapter 1 – “A brief History of Glass” contains interesting details about how glass came about and how it changed over the years. I believe understanding where glass comes from and how it developed gives Glass Artists a better understanding of glass and its possibilities. So I always like the history chapters.

Chapter 2 – “The Nature of Glass” provided extremely detailed information regarding how glass is created commercially (i.e., Silicon, Sodium, Limestone, etc), how it is colored (metallic oxides e.g., Copper, Ferrous, etc). Matter of fact I had flashbacks from my Chemistry class, (not necessarily a good thing).

Chapter 3 – Materials and Tools provided data on mold making materials, inclusion materials, finishes, miscellaneous materials, cleaning, gluing, cutting, mold tools, prefabricated molds, kilns, sandblasting and safety. There is a lot of good background information

Chapter 4 – “Preliminary Considerations” goes in-depth about glass compatibility when fusing glass. In addition to breaking down a firing schedule, devitrification, cleaning, cutting, and making molds. Again very detailed.

Chapter 5 – “Technical Procedures” discusses firing including slumping, tack, and full (provides a few examples), inclusions, finishes, kiln casting, etc.

Chapter 6 – “Step-by-Step Exercises” includes four different projects.

As I mentioned earlier, overall I liked “Warm Glass: A Complete Guide to Kiln-Forming Techniques: Fusing, Slumping, Casting”, albeit I think it is best utilized as a reference guide. However, I thought there was a little too much detail on mold making throughout the book. For my personal tastes, I do not think it is necessary to go into such an exhaustive explanation regarding making molds in each chapter. That being said I am glad I have “Warm Glass” in my library as a reference guide, especially if I ever decide to make my own molds from scratch.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

If you get a chance, check out all my sites, Fused Glass by Karen, My Etsy store, my Art fire Store, my Pinterest, and my YouTube Channel.

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Keeping my Kiln warm,

Karen

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